1699

Arabica Coffee was first planted by the Dutch in Indonesia (Batavia: Bidara Cina, Jatinegara, Palmerah, Kampung Melayu).

1707

VOC established coffee plantations in Priangan and Cirebon (Central Java).

1711

First Arabica beans from Java exported to Amsterdam.

1725

Coffee production in Java exceeds Yeman, the country origin of coffee.

1750

First Arabica seeds planted in Sulawesi (Tana Toraja).

1800

VOC required farmers to plant coffee and sell at a predetermined price (Verplichte Levering Stelsel).

1816
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1830

Farmers were required to pay agricultural tax, Sistem Pajak Bumi (Landelijk Stelsel).

1830
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1870

Farmer were forced to plant coffee, Sistem Tanam Paksa (Cultuur Stelsel).

1860

Eduard Douwes Dekker (Multatuli) wrote a book on the policy of forced cultivation "Max Havelaar: or The Coffee Auctions of the Dutch Trading Company".

1870

Granting of rights to private plantations for use of land for 75 years, Undang-Undang Agraria (AgrarischeWet).

1880
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1884

Indonesia coffee reaches its highest production level at 95,000 tonnes/year.

1876

Leaf rust disease killed all Arabica coffee plants except those at and above 1000 m elevation.

1878

The oldest Batavia coffee roaster Tek Sun Ho, Eerste Weltervredenche koffiebranderij, was established.

1900

First Robusta coffee was planted in Indonesia (seeds from Congo, Africa).

1927

Go Soe Loet establishes coffee plantation in West Java. Later it expands to produce coffee brand "kapal Api" local market leader.

1930

Toko kopi "Aroma" established in Bandung.

2001

Bakoel koffie opens; the fourth generation of "Tek Sun Ho" revitalizes their tradition of roasting Indonesian specialty coffee.

2002

Starbucks coffee first open in Indonesia. Bakoel koffie was first interviewed by CNN as the local coffee that has an edge to compete with Starbucks.

2003

The first book about coffee in Java was published "A Cup of Java" written by Gabriella Tegia and Mark Hanusz. Gabriella was also the owner of coffee resort and plantation in Losari Central Java.

2012

The local second wave cafes started to grow in Jakarta. The roastery and cafe concept: Caswell, Anomali, Liberica, Tanamera, Giyanti.

2013

The first book written by Indonesian writer, Prawoto Indarto, titled "The Road to Java Coffee".

2014

The local third wave cafes started to spread all around Jakarta and big cities in Indonesia.

2016

Indonesian beans won first place in the Specialty Coffee Association of America Expo in Atlanta, USA.